Why Don't We Talk Anymore

Rabbit & The Hare

Independent release, 2013

http://www.rabbitandthehare.com

REVIEW BY: Benjamin Ray

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: 11/01/2013

Many of us have a go-to artist for certain moods. Someone that comes to mind when we're working out, partying, driving, pumping up, relaxing, angry, sad, or happy. For those that need to fill a spot in the "chilling out" or "reflective on a rainy day" category, Rabbit & The Hare fits the bill nicely.

The band's debut disc (10 songs, 30 minutes) is relaxed and bittersweet sophisticated pop, using traditional rock instruments along with dual male/female vocals, strings and a flute, plenty of synths, and an air of wistfulness to set the mood. This gives the album an aura of preciousness; there is almost no muscle in a song like "Fragile Things" and a line like "Take your coat off and sit yourself down / I want to come around / You know you're just a fragile thing." my_heart_sings_the_harmony_web_ad_alt_250

Most of the songs have a very similar sound, not really distinguishing themselves from each other but rather working as a unit, something more than the sum of its parts. "Isabel" is an exception, a moving ballad sung with conviction by Marisa Duchowny that rises to an emotional chorus underscored by just enough strings. A song like "Roll The Dice" is more likely to get exposure (probably on "Grey's Anatomy"), but "Isabel" is the standout track and worth seeking out.

There is a slight Paul McCartney influence in the songwriting, particularly in the tricky bass playing and off-kilter sensibility of "Behind Your Eyes," while the regret of "Why Don't We Talk Anymore" is a simple but effective message that will resonate with anyone who has had a breakup or is in a struggling relationship; shame it is just over two minutes long. "Donna Donna" is pretty good, too, adding a bit of electric guitar and Duchwony's effective backup vocals; she shares the singing bill with Neill MacCallum (the guitarist and songwriter), but she steals the show from him more often than not.

Rabbit & The Hare won't change your life, make you call your ex or inspire you, but for those in the mood for something relaxing and dreamy on a wistful fall day, it does the trick.

Rating: C+

User Rating: Not Yet Rated


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